Sibelius as a Tool to Improve Student’s Ability of Making Counterpoint Melody

Authors

  • Oriana Tio Parahita Nainggolan Department of Music Education, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
  • Ayu Niza Machfazia Department of Music Education, Faculty of Languages and Arts, Yogyakarta State University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3158-3563
  • Fortunata Tyasrinestu Department of Music Education, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia and Graduate School of the Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6273-3320
  • Djohan Department of Performing Arts, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3158-3563
  • Phakkharawat Sittiprapaporn Neuropsychological Research Laboratory, Department of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Science, School of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine, Mae Fah Luang University, Bangkok, Thailand https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4103-9396

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.13052/jwe1540-9589.2087

Keywords:

Counterpoint, Melody, Sibelius

Abstract

As a subject for music students, counterpoint contributes to the ability to create a melody. The melody in counterpoint usually consists of two or more layers. In order to make a counterpoint melody, students must acknowledge the rules to construct the counterpoint melody. A good counterpoint melody involves two important things: the flow of the melody in a vertical and horizontal in vertical line (interval) and the musical texture of the melody. As a beginner in learning counterpoint, writing a counterpoint melody might be difficult at first. Learning counterpoint investigation was found that students spent a lot of their time following the counterpoint rules. They particularly did not focus on the musical sense of the counterpoint melody causing the melody loses its musical senses. Sibelius was used here as a tool to solve the problem. Sibelius is a music software which commonly used in writing musical scores. This study examined Sibelius in making a counterpoint melody in learning counterpoint. The data were gathered through observation and interviews with students during learning counterpoint course. The result showed that by using Sibelius, making counterpoint melody more efficient, and it helped student not only focused on the counterpoint rules but also the musical senses of the counterpoint melody. Furthermore, students also showed the improvement of their skills in making a counterpoint melody.

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Author Biographies

Oriana Tio Parahita Nainggolan, Department of Music Education, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Oriana Tio Parahita Nainggolan received Bachelor and Master’s degree of Music from Music Department, Faculty of Performing Arts, Graduate School of Institut Seni Indonesia Yogyakarta, Indonesia. She is currently a researcher at Music Education Department, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Her research interest is Performing Arts and Music.

Ayu Niza Machfazia, Department of Music Education, Faculty of Languages and Arts, Yogyakarta State University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Ayu Niza Machfazia received Bachelor’s degree of Music from Music Department, Faculty of Performing Arts, Undergraduate School of Indonesia Institute of the Arts Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. She received master’s degree of Technical and Vocational Education from Graduate School of Yogyakarta State University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. She is currently a researcher at Music Department, Faculty of Languages and Arts, Yogyakarta State University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Her research interest is Performing Arts and Music.

Fortunata Tyasrinestu, Department of Music Education, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia and Graduate School of the Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Fortunata Tyasrinestu received Bachelor’s degree in Music from the Indonesian Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, and Indonesian Literature from Universitas Gadjah Mada Yogyakarta, Masters’ degree in Psychology from Gadjah Mada University, and Doctoral degree in Social Sciences from Gadjah Mada University. She is Associate Professor at Music Department, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. She is currently a Director at Graduate School of Indonesia Institute of the Arts Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Her research interest includes Music Education and Social Sciences.

Djohan, Department of Performing Arts, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Djohan received bachelor’s degree in Music from Indonesia Institute of the Art, Yogyakarta. Masters’ degree in Psychology from Gadjah Mada University, and Doctoral degree in Psychology from Gadjah Mada University. He is currently a Professor at Music Performance Department, Faculty of Performing Arts, Indonesia Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. His research interest is Neuromusicology and Cognitive Ethnomusicology.

Phakkharawat Sittiprapaporn, Neuropsychological Research Laboratory, Department of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Science, School of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine, Mae Fah Luang University, Bangkok, Thailand

Phakkharawat Sittiprapaporn received Bachelor of Arts (Second Class Hons.) in English from Srinakharinwirot University, Thailand, Master of Arts in Linguistics, Institute of Language and Cultural for Research and Development from Mahidol University, Thailand, and Ph.D. in Neurosciences, Neuro-Behavioural Biology Center, Institute of Science and Technology for Research and Development Mahidol University, Thailand. He is currently a Head of Brain Science and Engineering Innovation Research Group, Mae Fah Luang University, and Neuropsychological Research Laboratory, as well as a lecturer at Department of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Science School of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine, Mae Fah Luang University, Bangkok, Thailand. His research interests are cognitive psychology, cognitive neurosciences, cerebral mechanisms in perception and cognition, brain mechanism of music and language perception and cognition, and neurobiology of learning and memory.

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Published

2021-11-21

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