Trustworthy Vehicular Communication Employing Multidimensional Diversification for Moving-target Defense

Authors

  • Esraa M. Ghourab Electrical Engineering Department, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21544, Egypt
  • Effat Samir Electrical Engineering Department, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21544, Egypt
  • Mohamed Azab Computer and Information Sciences Department, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA, USA and Informatics Research Institute, City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications, Alexandria, Egypt
  • Mohamed Eltoweissy Informatics Research Institute, City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications, Alexandria, Egypt

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.13052/2245-1439.821

Keywords:

Security, Diversity, Moving target defense, Vehicle to Vehicle (V2V) communication

Abstract

Enabling trustworthy Vehicle to Vehicle (V2V) communication given the wireless medium and the highly dynamic nature of the vehicular environment is a hard challenge. Eavesdropping and signal jamming in such highly dynamic environment is a real problem. This paper proposes a nature inspired multidimensional Moving-Target Defense (MTD) that employs real time spatiotemporal diversity to obfuscate wireless signals against attacker reach. In space: the mechanism manipulates the wireless transmission pattern and configuration to confuse eavesdroppers. In Time: we manipulate the transmission payload, by intentionally injecting some fake data into the real transmission. Further, the mechanism changes the data transmission granularity over time from fine to coarse grained data chunks. As a case study, we assumed the direct transmission model across dynamic multi-paths relayed communication via vehicles traveling on a multi-lane road. The system is evaluated based on a complete analysis of the system model and comprehensive simulated scenarios. Results showed the effectiveness of the presented approach with an increased confusion factor, a massive reduction in the intercept probability and clear increase in the channel secrecy.

 

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Author Biographies

Esraa M. Ghourab, Electrical Engineering Department, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21544, Egypt

Esraa M. Ghourab is one of the founders and a researcher at the IoT Cyber Security Lab, SmartCI, Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Egypt. She worked with the lab team members towards a set of innovative research and business-oriented projects related to Cyber Security, Smart IoT systems, Software Defined Secure wireless communication.

She supervised young researchers working on their 1st papers. Esraa received her M.Sc in Communication Engineering, in 2018 and B.S in Electrical Communication Engineering Major with, GPA 3.85 in 2014, from Alexandria University. Currently, her research interests cross cuts the areas of Vehicular Wireless Communication, Trustworthy wireless signals, and Moving-target Defense for secure wireless data exchange.

Effat Samir, Electrical Engineering Department, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21544, Egypt

Effat Samir is a Research assistant at Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Egypt. Effat received her Bsc. and M.Sc. in Communication and Electronics Engineering in 2013 and 2017 from Faculty of engineering, Alexandria University. She has worked in multiple research projects focusing on both physical and application layers. She has 2 book chapters among various publications in archival journals and conference proceedings. During her master studies she developed an interest in the IT physical layer; specially Nanotechnology field with a major interest in Nano-sensors fabrication, characterization, and calibration. Further, her recent crosscuts are oriented more in the IT application layer. She developed a huge research interests lie in the area of Vehicular Ad-Hoc Networks, Internet of Things (IoT), and Machine learning techniques.

Mohamed Azab, Computer and Information Sciences Department, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA, USA and Informatics Research Institute, City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications, Alexandria, Egypt

Mohamed Azab is an assistant professor at The CIS, Virginia Military Institute. He is also affiliated with The City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications, The SmartCI Research Center, VT-MENA, (Virginia Tech- Middle East and North Africa), College of Engineering Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt.

Mohamed received his Ph.D. in Computer Engineering in 2013 from The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA.

He has multiple provisional patents, book chapters among various publications in archival journals and respected conference proceedings.

His research interests lie in the area of cyber security and trustworthy engineering ranging from theory to design to implementation. His recent research crosscuts the areas Software Defined Networking (SDN) architectures and protocols, high performance and cloud computing, ubiquitous Internet of Things (IoT), and Cyber-Physical systems (CPS).

Mohamed is the founder of the Cyber Security and IoT lab. Hosting Mohamed’s Ph.D. and Masters students research activities.

Mohamed acted as a keynote speaker in multiple prestigious conferences. He served on multiple conference and workshop program and steering committees.

Mohamed Eltoweissy, Informatics Research Institute, City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications, Alexandria, Egypt

Mohamed Eltoweissy is Department Head and Professor of Computer and Information Sciences at Virginia Military Institute. He is also a Professor affiliated with The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech.

Eltoweissy served as Chief Scientist for Secure Cyber Systems at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He also served on the faculty of James Madison University.

Eltoweissy co-founded several start-up companies including Video Semantics and Teradata Science.

Eltoweissy’s current interests crosscut the areas of network security and resilience, cooperative autonomic systems, and networking architecture and protocols.

Eltoweissy has over 175 publications in archival journals and respected books and conference proceedings and an extensive funding record. He also served on the editorial board of IEEE Transactions on Computers (the flagship and oldest Transactions of the IEEE Computer Society) as well as other reputable journals.

In addition, Eltoweissy is active as an invited speaker at both the national and international levels. Eltoweissy received several awards and recognition for research, education, service, and entrepreneurship, including best paper awards, top placements at Cyber Security competitions, and a nomination for the Virginia SCHEV Outstanding Faculty Awards, the highest honor for faculty in Virginia. Eltoweissy is a senior member of IEEE and ACM.

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Published

2018-09-30

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