USING GAME THEORY IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING EDUCATION THOUGH CASE STADY METHODOLOGY: KODAK VS POLARIOD IN THE MARKET FOR INSTANT CAMERAS

Authors

  • ANDRÉS FAÍÑA Grupo Jean Monnet de Competitividad y Desarrollo Department of Economic Analysis and Business Administration University of A Coruña, Campus de Elviña, s/n, 15071, Spain
  • JESÚS LÓPEZ-RODRÍGUEZ Grupo Jean Monnet de Competitividad y Desarrollo Department of Economic Analysis and Business Administration University of A Coruña, Campus de Elviña, s/n, 15071, Spain
  • LAURA VARELA-CANDAMIO Grupo Jean Monnet de Competitividad y Desarrollo Department of Economic Analysis and Business Administration University of A Coruña, Campus de Elviña, s/n, 15071, Spain

Keywords:

game theory, non-cooperative games, Nash equilibrium, Case study, Engineering Education

Abstract

Our teaching proposal lies in explaining some of the core concepts of non-cooperative game theory by means of real cases of strategic decision within the computer engineering education. The innovative features of our methodology are based on the use of PC simulations to analyze the strategic decisions faced by Kodak and Polaroid under several circumstances. The discussion of the Kodak vs Polaroid case fits very well to introduce the students the economic perspectives within the more technical discipline of engineering. With this new e-learning method, one the one hand, the students of computer engineering get a more realistic and complete vision in their learning and on the other reduce the degree of abstraction of the theory itself and thereby a greater motivation and interest in social sciences is achieved.

 

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Published

2014-08-31

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