A Tool for the Simulation of Turbo-Machine Auxiliary Lubrication Plants

Authors

  • Luca Pugi Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
  • Roberto Conti Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
  • D. Nocciolini Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
  • E. Galardi Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
  • A. Rindi Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
  • Stefano Rossin General Electric Nuovo Pignone srl, Florence, Italy

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1080/14399776.2014.931130

Keywords:

real time code prototyping, lube oil console, rotating machinery, Hazard and Operability analysis, transient behaviour analysis

Abstract

The reliability and safety of large turbo-machinery systems used in the oil and gas industries are heavily affected by the efficiency of the lubrication plant. In particular, hazard and operability (HAZOP) analyses are often performed using piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID; according to regulations in force, ISO 14617). Usually, these analyses are time-consuming and affected by potentially dangerous errors. In this work, a tool for the mono-dimensional simulation of thermal hydraulic plants is presented and applied to the analysis of safety-relevant components of compressor and pumping units, such as the lubrication circuits. Compared to known commercial products, the proposed tool is optimised for fixed step solvers in order to make real-time (RT) integration easier. The proposed tool defines a general approach, and can be used as a SimScape-Simulink library of thermal-hydraulic components (designed according to the P&ID definitions). Another interesting feature of the tool is the automatic scheme generation, where the Simulink model can be automatically generated by P&ID schemes.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Luca Pugi, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

Luca Pugi received the degree in mechanical engineering in 1999 from the University of Florence, Florence, Italy, and the Doctorate degree in applied mechanics in 2003 from the University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. He currently works at the department of industrial engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, where he is involved in design and simulation of mechatronic systems, mainly for vehicle applications collaborating with relevant industrial partners such as General Electric, Trenitalia SPA, Ansaldo Breda, Ansaldo Signal, Pramac SPA, ECM SPA, Velan ABV, Italcertifer SPA, etc. He also perform didactical activities concerning mechatronics and modelling of dynamical systems and electric traction systems. He is the author or co-author of about 170 publications. He is the winner of several international awards: In 2000, the “Cesare Bianchi” award from the Italian Association of Railway Engineers (CIFI), Rome, Italy. In 2009 He was awarded by CIFI with the Mallegori Award. In 2011 at WCRR (World Congress of Railway Research), he was awarded with a premium for the section “increasing freight capacities and services”.

Roberto Conti, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

Roberto Conti is a Ph.D. Researcher and Assistant Professor of Robotics with the School of Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. His current research interests include robotics, wearable robotics, and underwater robotics.

D. Nocciolini, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

Daniele Nocciolini is a Ph. D Researcher at the Dept. of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence. His current research interests include Vehicle Dynamics and Mechatronics, including Mechanic and Fluidic Systems.

E. Galardi, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

Emanuele Galardi has his Master Degree in Electrical and Automation Engineering and is a Ph.D. researcher at the Dept. of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence. His current research interests are: Control, Vehicle Dynamics and Mechatronics (including Electric, Fluidic and Mechanic Systems).

A. Rindi, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

Andrea Rindi was Born in Florence in 1967. In 1996 he has gained his degree in mechanical engineering at University of Florence discussing a thesis concerning an high speed pantograph.

Stefano Rossin, General Electric Nuovo Pignone srl, Florence, Italy

Stefano Rossin graduated in 1999 with a M.S. Degree in Aeronautical Engineering at the University Pisa. He began his career early in year 1989 before achieving his M.S. degree in several fields starting from a meteorological research center, moving to a chemical research laboratory and eventually in an Aerospace Company. In 1999, Stefano moved to The Netherlands working for about 6 years as application engineer for a consulting firm on development of complex non-linear computational analysis on structural and fluid flow fields for R&D core businesses of Shell Exploration & Research, Goodyear Tires, Philips, Fokker Aerospace and Xerox.

In August 2005, Stefano Joined GE Oil&Gas in Florence (Italy) as Design engineer for the Gas Turbine auxiliary system team and In 2007 promoted to the advanced mechanical analysis leader role. In 2010 Stefano moved to Principal Engineer on Mechanical, piping and Fluid Systems for the Auxiliary system engineering team focusing mainly on Root Cause Analysis and field investigation, and since February 2012 he is holding the position as Consulting Engineering for the GE Oil&Gas Turbo Machinery System engineering organization acting as Subsection Chief engineer for Centrifugal compressors, Gas Turbine and industrial Plant mechanical systems.

He is author of two patents and 10 international papers 2 of which developed in cooperation with important Oil&Gas customers such as Shell Exploration and Exxon Mobil. In June 2013 Stefano received the GE Edison Pioneer Award, an honor presented to one individual selected every year from across GE globally and recognizing mid-career technologists who demonstrate technical excellence and customer impact.

References

Bouamama, B. O. 2003. Bondgraph Approach as Analysis Tool

in Thermofluid Model Library Conception. Journal of the

Franklin Institute, Vol. 340, No. 1, pp. 1–23.

Crawley, F., Preston, M. and Tyler, B. 2008. HAZOP Guide to

Best Practice. IChemE, Rugby, UK.

Deuflhard, P., Hairer, E. and Zugck, J. 1987. One-Step and

Extrapolation Methods for Differential-Algebraic Systems.

Numerische Mathematik Vol. 51, pp. 501–516.

Duqiang, W., Burton, R., and Schoenau, G. 2002. An Empirical

Discharge Coefficient Model for Orifice Flow. International

Journal of Fluid Power, Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 13–19.

Karnopp, D. C. and Rosenberg, R. C. 1975. System Dynamics.

John Wiley, New York: A Unified Approach.

Kulakowski, B. T., Gardner, J. F. and Shearer, J. L., 2007.

Dynamic Modelling and Control of Engineering Systems.

rd edn. Cambridge University Press, New York, USA.

LMS Amesim Technical Documentation (online help version

1 or later).

Lubich, C. 1989. Linearly Implicit Extrapolation Methods for

Differential-Algebraic Systems. Numerische Mathematik,

Vol. 55, pp. 197–211.

Manring, N. D. 2005. Hydraulic Control Systems. New York:

John Wiley.

Matlab–Simulink Technical Documentation (online help version

A or later).

Merrit, H. E. 1967. Hydraulic Control Systems. New York:

John Wiley.

Pugi, L., Malvezzi, M., Allotta, B., Banchi, L. and Presciani, P.

A Parametric Library for the Simulation of a Union

Internationale des Chemins de Fer (UIC) Pneumatic Braking

System. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical

Engineers, Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit, Vol.

, No. 2, pp. 117–132.

Pugi, L., Rindi, A., Ercole, A. G., Palazzolo, A., Auciello, J.,

Fioravanti, D. and Ignesti, M. 2011. Preliminary studies

concerning the application of different braking arrangements

on Italian freight trains. Vehicle System Dynamics,

Vol. 49, No. 8, pp. 1339–1365.

Downloads

Published

2018-12-29

Issue

Section

Original Article

Most read articles by the same author(s)