COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF A HYDRAULIC SERVO-VALVE

Authors

  • Lorenzo Pace Politecnico di Torino, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIASP), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY
  • Marco Ferro Politecnico di Torino, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIASP), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY
  • Federico Fraternale Politecnico di Torino, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIASP), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY
  • Matteo Dalla Vedova matteo.dallavedova@polito.it
  • Antonio Caimano paolo.maggiore@polito.it
  • Paolo Maggiore Politecnico di Torino, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIASP), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY

Keywords:

Servo-valve behaviour, hydraulic CFD, meatus flow description, variable orifice analysis, spool valve discharge coefficient.

Abstract

The aim of this work was to obtain the correct hydraulic proprieties of a hydraulic spool servo-valve using computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) techniques and adopting an accurate enough mesh to analyse the flow pattern inside the valve. The zones where thickening of the mesh is necessary have been detected and a method to generate the mesh, based on Reynolds numbers and spool stroke, has successfully been used to minimize computational resources. A comparison with numerical and experimental results (Dong and Ueno, 1999) confirms the accurate description of the behaviour of the valve. The results have been compared with the theoretical behaviour, through a 1D multi-physics model simulation, in order to understand in which conditions the theoretical model is not able to describe the valve properties carefully enough and a more accurate CFD model should be used. As CFD analysis requires high computational resources, a method to improve 1D model accuracy through CFD techniques has been proposed, so that after a preliminary CFD analysis of the valve, it would be possible to analyse a whole hydraulic system with a 1D model.

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Author Biographies

Lorenzo Pace, Politecnico di Torino, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIASP), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY

Lorenzo Pace is currently a Ph.D. student at the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department (DIMEAS) Politecnico di Torino, with the support of Thales Alenia Space. He worked for three years as Assistant Researcher at Politecnico di Torino, in the field of multi-physics analysis of complex systems, within the EU project CRESCENDO, applied to the aircraft cabin air treatment. He has been also involved in the development and testing of fuel cell power system for aerospace application.

Marco Ferro, Politecnico di Torino, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIASP), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY

Marco Ferro pursued the M.Sc. degree in aerospace engineering both at Politecnico di Torino and Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm within the Pegasus education programme. For his B.Sc. thesis, advised by Prof. Maggiore, he developed model and CFD calculations for different geometry servo-valves. He is currently Ph.D. student at KTH in Stockholm

Federico Fraternale, Politecnico di Torino, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIASP), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY

Federico Fraternale pursued the M.Sc. degree in aerospace engineering at Politecnico di Torino, with a thesis completed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge (Massachusetts). For his B.Sc. thesis, advised by Prof. Maggiore, he developed model and CFD calculations for different geometry servo-valves.

Matteo Dalla Vedova, matteo.dallavedova@polito.it

Matteo Dalla Vedova received the M.Sc. and the Ph.D. from the Politecnico di Torino in 2003 and 2007, respectively. He is currently assistant researcher at the Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering. His research focus lies in design, analysis and numerical simulation of on board systems and developing prognostic algorithms for aerospace servomechanism and flight controls.

Antonio Caimano, paolo.maggiore@polito.it

Antonio Caimano is actually CFD analyst at CNH, a Fiat Industrial company. In the previous three years worked as Assistant Researcher at Politecnico di Torino, Aerospace Engineering department (former DIASP, now DIMEAS), collaborating with the major Italian aerospace companies for European research projects focused mainly on energy systems. He graduated (M.Sc.) in aerospace engineering and attended a post-degree master course in energy systems at Politecnico di Torino.

Paolo Maggiore, Politecnico di Torino, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIASP), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY

Paolo Maggiore is a professor at the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department (DIMEAS) of Politecnico di Torino, which joined in 1992, where he teaches aerospace general systems engineering. Currently his students are involved in projects ranging from hydrogen fuel cell powered airplanes and UAVs, and health monitoring of flight controls, to multidisciplinary design optimization of aerospace systems design. Prof. Maggiore is AIAA member.

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Published

2018-12-30

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Original Article